Big Two-Hearted River

These early stories go astray now and then. But they contain some of the purest writing in all of American literature. 

Plus stiles. Jesus. 

Nick looked at the burned-over stretch of hillside, where he had expected to find the scattered houses of the town and then walked down the railroad track to the bridge over the river. The river was there. It swirled against the log stiles of the bridge. Nick looked down into the clear, brown water, colored from the pebbly bottom, and watched the trout keeping themselves steady in the current with wavering fins. As he watched them they changed their positions by quick angles, only to hold steady in the fast water again. Nick watched them a long time. 

He watched them holding themselves with their noses in to the current, many trout in deep, fast moving water, slightly distorted as he watched far down through the glassy convex surface of the pool, its surface pushing and swelling smooth against the resistance of the log-dirven piles of the bridge. At the bottom of the pool are the big trout. He did not see them at first. Then he saw them at the bottom of the pool, big trout looking to hold themselves on the gravel bottom in a varying mist of gravel and sand, raised in spurts by the current.

from Big Two-Hearted River, Part I, in The Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway
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